Viral Video Game Blog

Here are 8 links where you can download Girl Talk’s new album “All Day”

Girl Talk’s new album, “All Day”, was released yesterday.  The whole Internet is currently scrambling to get their hands on it.  Here are 8 links you can download it from, courtesy of Girl Talk’s website, Illegal Art.

According to his Twitter account, more download links are coming, as well as a FLAC download.

http://www.mediafire.com/?vy057v6rld16oee
http://hotfile.com/dl/82708513/c2cc374/Girl_Talk_-_All_Day_IA123_.rar.html
http://rapidshare.com/files/431007441/Girl_Talk_-_All_Day.zip
http://hotfile.com/dl/82737194/10b4ffc/Girl_Talk_-_All_Day_(IA123)_mp3s.zip.html
http://www.fileserve.com/file/VTHERSe/www.NewAlbumReleases.net_Girl
http://www.gigasize.com/get.php?d=x48mbhdh3dc
http://d01.megashares.com/dl/kydpIvf/Girl%20Talk%20-%20All%20Day.zip
http://www.filesonic.com/file/r000216945/32493377/girl_talk_-_all_day_ia123

November 16, 2010 Posted by | Normal Stuffs | , , , , , | Comments Off on Here are 8 links where you can download Girl Talk’s new album “All Day”

Why I haven’t been playing the Cataclysm Beta


Go ahead, hate me. I’m in the Cataclysm beta and haven’t logged into it in nearly two weeks.

Why? Life happens. I may write for a video game blog in my spare time, but that spare time seems less and less. I get home from work each weekday with about 7 hours before I end up going to bed. Living in the greater Philadelphia area, approximately 3 hours of that is chewed up by watching the Phillies, especially now in the postseason. (How ’bout that Halladay no-hitter last night?) Even after baseball season is gone, that time’s gonna be funneled into the Flyers. (season opener tonight on Versus)

Weekends have even less time for gaming, since I spend most of the weekend with my girlfriend. Can’t play videogames because of sports and women? Am I developing a life? I might have to turn in my geek badge and soldering gun after a quarter century of dedicated service.

When all’s said and done, I think I now have less than 10 hours each week to dedicate to gaming. Coming from being used to making gaming a second full-time job, it’s a huge shock. My pile of games to play grows as my time to play them shrinks. I haven’t finished a game since last October when I was unemployed and powered through Brutal Legend in two days.

The current list of games I’ve been playing (and what I’ll spend the rest of this post on – I swear this is a gaming blog, not a “living a boring life” blog) is as follows:

Team Fortress 2
Magic: The Gathering – Duels of the Planeswalkers
Assassin’s Creed II

Team Fortress 2
Yeah, it’s a game I’ve had for more than 2 years now, but the recent (probably not as recent as I think) Mann-Conomy pack has breathed a lot of new life and fun into the game. I had stopped playing right after the Sniper/Spy updates, so the weapon dynamic has completely changed with all the newer class updates. The number of achievements has nearly doubled, and the new item drop/shop/trade/upgrade system has made the game incredibly rich and complex, while still being fun and simple to jump into when you have 15 minutes to kill.

If you haven’t played TF2 in a while, break it out. It’s still able to eat 5 hours of your time in a sitting.

Magic: The Gathering – Duels of the Planeswalkers
I’ve been a Magic player for 16 years now. I’m sure there are first-time readers stumbling onto this blog who were born around the time I started playing Magic. I was always quite good at the game mechanics, but had a very simple problem that kept me out of building incredible decks. Some decks cost $100+ just to obtain the basic resources to cast your spells. You could be looking at another $75-300 for your actual deck concept. It’s a game of outbuying your opponent, and I was always broke as hell as a kid.

The economic metagame is taken out of the equation in Duels of the Planeswalkers. There are a handful of fixed decks with unlockable sideboards (expansion cards that can be optionally added or swapped with cards in the base deck), each with roughly the same level of power depending on their core concept. I found this aspect highly enjoyable, because I was no longer at the mercy of my collection. (My actual Magic collection is expansive, more than 6,000 cards, but very few of my decks have all of what they need to reach their maximum potential. Furthermore, these decks are quite old and no longer sanctioned for tournament play.)

What I especially like about Duels of the Planeswalkers is the “Challenge Mode.” This is a series of single-turn puzzles that throw the player in the middle of a game in-progress (often in dire straits) with a simple objective: Win the game. This mimicked a series of similar puzzles published as a single photo in InQuest magazine back when I used to play heavily. It’s a fun bit of nostalgia, though I ran into a few cases where I successfully completed the challenge in a way the game wasn’t prepared to handle and lost.

Challenge Mode is my current go-to time waster when I sit at my computer and have a few minutes (rapidly spiraling into a half hour) to waste.

Assassin’s Creed II
Rounding out my “wasting my life on games that are nothing new” collection is AC2. I never played the first one, but the second one has me pretty deep. The storyline is presented in an awesome way, the ease of performing pretty badass assassinations on guards is a lot of fun, and the game does a great job representing boring collection systems (statues, feathers, seals, weapons, etc) in a slightly immersive way (having to drop items off at various locations, integrating it with the villa’s development)

There’s really just one thing keeping it from locking down my time 100%: Jumping puzzles. It’s not 2003 anymore. I know Ubisoft made Prince of Persia and probably even used the same engine to make Assassin’s Creed, but there’s nothing fun about jumping puzzles, especially with Assassin’s Creed’s wonky freerunning controls. I’ve abandoned several Assassin’s Tombs because the jumping puzzles were tedious and frustrating. It’s an unfortunate detraction to an otherwise perfect game.

So that’s too many words on why I haven’t done a Cataclysm beta live stream recently. Hopefully I can scrape together the time to do one in the next week or so. Stay tuned to this blog and I’ll let you know when I expect to do it. It seems my Vashj’ir blog posts were somewhat popular, so I’m sure some of you would like to see Vashj’ir live.

October 7, 2010 Posted by | Normal Stuffs | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Why I haven’t been playing the Cataclysm Beta

The honest truth about Final Fantasy XI

I found out that the complete collection of FFXI is available on Steam for $10. What follows are my opinions based on my experiences with the game and its effects on a friend of mine.

(11:50:28 PM) surrealcatalyst: And good god, that’s such a fucking trap
(11:50:37 PM) surrealcatalyst: $10 for FFXI complete on Steam
(11:51:07 PM) surrealcatalyst: That game is part of a series of retaliation attacks for Hiroshima and Nagasakai.
(11:53:25 PM) surrealcatalyst: That game is a syphillis-laden cheese grater sized so that Japanese dicks pass harmlessly through it
(11:53:36 PM) surrealcatalyst: And the Japanese have a fun game of goading foreigners into sticking their dicks in it.
(11:53:58 PM) surrealcatalyst: I had a friend fail out of school playing that game
(11:54:07 PM) surrealcatalyst: Then not move out of the dorm after failing out
(11:54:12 PM) surrealcatalyst: And not tell his parents that he failed out
(11:54:26 PM) surrealcatalyst: While accumulating 375+ character levels in FFXI.
(11:56:34 PM) surrealcatalyst: WoW hasn’t even done that to people I know.

October 4, 2010 Posted by | Normal Stuffs | , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on The honest truth about Final Fantasy XI

Cataclysm Beta Impressions: Vashj’ir

In one word: Amazing.

In a song, what else?

Seriously, it looks and feels like this, which is a great thing. I might need to loop this song when I do my live streams of it.

The Vashj’ir experience starts with one of the most cinematic events you’ll ever see in-game, but I don’t think I want to spoil it. Suffice to say, it has fades and soft focus and all sorts of storytelling visual aids you wouldn’t expect to find in an MMO. Blizzard certainly learned their lesson from Wrathgate, and has the cinematics team working overtime on in-game content.

Vashj’ir proper begins inside of a shipwreck. Mercifully, the first quest rewards you with the Sea Legs buff. Before I go on with the zone flow, I’d like to say a few things about Vashj’ir conceptually.

I always wanted to see an underwater zone, ever since the first time I had to run into the Temple of Atal’Hakkar in Swamp of Sorrows. Having to swim underwater to get to an instance was a really different experience, and made me want all the combat to take place underwater. Also, playing a Warlock at the time, I saw that as requiring a Warlock to complete the dungeon, which would have been a positive for me.

Vanilla-era WoW environment design would have been awful at implementing an underwater zone or dungeon. This was the design mindset that thought a 5-hour slog through Blackrock Depths would be fun. There would be no “quality of life” buff like Sea Legs in a Vashj’ir designed by that mindset.

Sea Legs makes Vashj’ir. Vashj’ir without Sea Legs would be awful. The zone is absolutely massive, essentially its own continent roughly the size of Nagrand. Moving around that at 70% movement speed would take forever and make the zone very unfun. An underwater zone needs to be huge to work properly. The 60% movement speed buff works out very well, making walking speed in Vashj’ir slightly faster than normal ground walking speed, making the space between mobs and quests more than tolerable. Furthermore, a lack of permanent underwater breathing buff would have made the zone as much fun as those underwater levels in Sonic the Hedgehog. (I know how much everyone loved the “running out of air” music or that little chime warning that the panic music was about to start.)

Thanks to this buff, you can explore the depths of the ocean freely and at a pace that keeps it fun. Which is great, because the atmosphere of being underwater is something that truly needs to be experienced. The color scheme and art design is great, but what really sells the concept is the feeling that certain death is everywhere and about to strike. With raytraced shadows on, the massive shadows of mobs loom overhead, leading you to believe that large sharks or naga are about to descend upon you. Combat happens in 360 degrees, which is a blast. Adding to the confusion are the towering kelp plants obscuring your vision. On numerous occasions, I had mobs hiding behind them, aggroing me when I got too close.

The final touch of genius is that Blizzard found a way to neutralize the convenience of quest objective sparkles. There is an early quest where items are resting on the seabed against sand that is nearly the same color as the sparkles and the items. With the underwater wave effect, the sparkles are almost invisible further than 5 yards away.

After the first hub’s worth of quests, you get your underwater mount, the Abyssal Seahorse. The Abyssal Seahorse makes a great zone even better. It swims at 450%, which I don’t feel like doing the math on, but I believe it makes it a bit faster than a 310% flying mount. While riding the seahorse, you absolutely fly along underwater.

So far, Vashj’ir has been a brilliant zone. I spent 2+ hours there last night and didn’t even finish the first subzone or find the entrance to the Throne of Tides instance. Hopefully in the coming days, I’ll do another live stream of the zone, with many more viewers this time.

September 30, 2010 Posted by | Normal Stuffs | , , , , , , | Comments Off on Cataclysm Beta Impressions: Vashj’ir

Cataclysm Live Beta Stream 6:00PM EST

That’s right, I’ll be running a live stream from the Cataclysm beta tonight at 6:00 Eastern Standard Time.  From the poll that I ran for the past 18 hours or so, it looks like I’ll be primarily be playing either a Feral Druid tank or a Resto Shaman.

I’ve never played a Shaman above level 25 or so.  You may be in for a treat as I try to struggle my way through healing instances for the first time on a class I have little familiarity with.

I’ll also be taking viewer requests for what content they’d like to see.  Feel free to post requests in comments to this post, as I’ll be checking it before starting the stream.

Available here: http://www.ustream.tv/channel/surrealcatalyst-live

September 29, 2010 Posted by | Normal Stuffs | , , , , | Comments Off on Cataclysm Live Beta Stream 6:00PM EST

What Cataclysm Class to stream or not to stream…

So I’m in the Cataclysm beta, and I could fire up a Ustream of beta footage, taking requests from viewers as to what content they would like me to find.  Does that sound appealing to anyone?

I’d most likely run the stream around 6 or 7 PM EST on weekdays.

That said,

September 28, 2010 Posted by | Normal Stuffs | , , , , | Comments Off on What Cataclysm Class to stream or not to stream…

World of Warcraft: Worn out, used up

Ashen's first time killing Ragnaros in MC

Where’s the fun in Massively Multiplayer when you’ve lost the tolerance for the masses, and can’t find yourself a single other player to spend time with in the game?

I started playing WoW on Christmas Day 2004.  My friends from home, along with all of my suitemates at college had all purchased the game at roughly the same time.  At that time, I bounced between a few servers, both Alliance and Horde, to find out where I was going to play.

I settled on the Arthas server, along with two suitemates and a close friend, despite my roommate playing on Durotan.  We formed our own guild and leveled to 60 over the next 5-6 months, having fun and spending numerous sleepless nights playing the game.

Some time after hitting 60, my friends’ interest in the game tapered off.  I left the guild we had formed and found my way into a group of guilds that ran raid content together.  For several months, I raided Molten Core and Onyxia’s Lair with this alliance of guilds, until the more hardcore among us grew tired of the more casual players who weren’t mirroring our efforts.

In January 2006, those hardcore members of our alliance formed our new guild (with its appropriately angsty and reflective name) – Ashen : The Brotherhood of the Fallen.  I would find myself playing and raiding with Ashen nonstop for the next 7 months, failing three courses in college and quitting a part time job at Staples to do so.

Ashen was a playing experience I have never matched in more than 5 years of playing this game.  At the time, it was considered an arduous task to assemble 40 players on a single night per week to raid, let alone form a guild of fewer than 50 players capable of fielding a 40-man raid on three set nights per week.  The members of Ashen had an incomprehensible dedication and focus to our raiding, and in those 7 months, we powered through our three roadblock bosses in Molten Core (Golemagg, Majordomo and Ragnaros) and reduced Onyxia to farm status, as well as powering through Blackwing Lair.

I sometimes take off the rose-tinted glasses and reflect upon the people I raided with – vaguely familiar names that occasionally sprinkle my Facebook feed, dormant names on instant messenger friends lists.  Some of them really were great people, and passed for a reasonable online definition of ‘friends.’  Others, however, were the same blatantly annoying personalities that I hate to see yelling out in trade chat, or spouting overused catchphrases in comments sections online (often using ‘lol’ as punctuation).

It’s the latter category that I’ve long since outgrown.  As I’ve grown older, I’ve lost my ability to cope with and overlook that mentality in any theater.  Whether it be online gaming, blog comments, Facebook comments, casual conversation – I can’t stand attention whoring and half-assed attempts to be, for lack of a better term, the class clown.

Unfortunately, those people are the loud minority (or are they a majority?) of online gamers.  One simply needs to watch the brilliant documentary Second Skin (which is available for instant streaming on Netflix at the moment) and see the stereotypical online gamer in action (or would that be inaction?)  This is the representation of the 12+ million WoW players in the world.  No one tells stories or remembers how normal a WoW player they knew was.

I am part of a lost faction of online gamers.  The silent thinkers.  Social gamers with the self-control to only speak when they have something to say.  Granted, I have plenty to say, but I’ve seen what my audience looks like.  I know the audience won’t respond.  I know my words will simply be cast out to an ocean of ignorance and self-importance, so I say nothing.

WoW is my personal hell.  A social player surrounded by thousands of other players, yet the vast majority I have encountered have not been worth my time.  I’m a gamer from a simpler time, where a player with the right attitude was more important than their character’s equipment.  Better gear drops all the time.  Terrible players don’t necessarily get better.

I enjoy raiding, but I’m not an eager young 20-year-old raider anymore.  I’m older, wiser, and quite frankly – tired.  I don’t have the patience to live in the modern ‘raid scene’, where no one cares to find a group of people they enjoy playing with.  Instead, my desire to see complex encounters and the aspect of the game I find the most fun is met with, “OMG WTF LINK 9000+ GS and ACHIEV, NUB!”

So instead, here I sit nearly 6 years later.  Experienced in nearly all aspects of the game, 5 characters at the max level, and no method to take any of them further without subjecting myself to the tedium of the majority attitude toward endgame content.  So how about it, Arthas?  Is there any intelligent life left out there?

September 28, 2010 Posted by | Normal Stuffs | , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

Here Comes A New Challenger!

So you thought Jamie complained about gaming a lot.

Welcome to the surreal side of gaming.  I’m one of the biggest elitist dicks to ever grace the Internet.  Until now, I had the common courtesy to shut up and bitch about you in private, but now I’m here to smite you with your own nerdrage.  And believe me, I have an unlimited supply of it: I’m a longtime WoW player.

I will give you columns that take shit post to a new level.  Indeed, my words will burn like the morning after an all you can eat Ghost Pepper quesadilla night.

I’d like to explain the Cambridge Steamer.  It’s like a Cleveland Steamer, but I shit in your brain.  Every time I’m asked to write an article, that’s what you’ll get.  I will shit pure hatred into the brains of my fellow gamers, because I hate you all.  In time, you’ll hate me, too.

Soon after, you’ll learn to love it, and never live without hearing my anger.  I will give you a Cambridge Steamer when asked, and your tears will give me sustenance.

I hate you all,

Surrealcatalyst

July 19, 2010 Posted by | Normal Stuffs | , | Comments Off on Here Comes A New Challenger!